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A Reformation Debate: Sadoleto's Letter to the Genevans and by John C. Olin, John Calvin, Visit Amazon's Jacopo Sadoleto

By John C. Olin, John Calvin, Visit Amazon's Jacopo Sadoleto Page, search results, Learn about Author Central, Jacopo Sadoleto,

In 1539, Cardinal Jacopo Sadoleto, Bishop of Carpentras, addressed a letter to the magistrates and electorate of Geneva, asking them to come back to the Roman Catholic religion. John Calvin responded to Sadoleto, protecting the adoption of the Protestant reforms. Sadoleto's letter and Calvin's answer represent the most fascinating exchanges of Roman Catholic/Protestant perspectives throughout the Reformationand an outstanding advent to the good non secular controversy of the 16th century. those statements usually are not in vacuo of a Roman Catholic and Protestant place. They have been drafted in the middle of the spiritual clash that used to be then dividing Europe. and so they mirror too the temperaments and private histories of the lads who wrote them. Sadoleto's letter has an irenic procedure, an emphasis at the solidarity and peace of the Church, hugely attribute of the Christian Humanism he represented. Calvin's answer is partially a private protection, an apologia seasoned vita sua, that files his personal spiritual adventure. And its taut, accomplished argument is attribute of the disciplined and logical brain of the writer of The Institutes of the Christian faith.

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A Reformation Debate: Sadoleto's Letter to the Genevans and Calvin's Reply

In 1539, Cardinal Jacopo Sadoleto, Bishop of Carpentras, addressed a letter to the magistrates and voters of Geneva, asking them to come to the Roman Catholic religion. John Calvin answered to Sadoleto, protecting the adoption of the Protestant reforms. Sadoleto's letter and Calvin's answer represent probably the most attention-grabbing exchanges of Roman Catholic/Protestant perspectives in the course of the Reformationand an outstanding creation to the nice non secular controversy of the 16th century.

Additional resources for A Reformation Debate: Sadoleto's Letter to the Genevans and Calvin's Reply

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And this greatest benefit of Jesus Christ toward us, and principal proof therein oE His divinity, was bothinstituted by God in the mission of the Son, and undertaken by the Son Himself, and by Him given in its own time, and bestowed upon us, that we, being aided in Christ alone, with all divine and human counsels, helps, and virtues, might present our souls to God in safety. , the soul of man, that, in order to its not being lost, but gainedboth to GodHimselfand to us, the laws of universal nature having been utterly disturbed, and the order of things changed, God descended to the earth, that He might become man, and man was raised to heaven, that he might be a God.

And since the way of Christ is arduous, and the method of leading a life conformable to His laws and precepts very diflicult (because we are enjoined to withdraw our minds from the contamination of earthly pleasures, and fix them on this 26 SADOLETO’S LETTER TO THE GENEVANS one object-to despise the present good which we have in our hands, and aspire to the future, which we see not), still of such value to each one of us is the salvation of himself and of his soul, that we must bring our minds to decline nothing, however harsh, and endure everything, however laborious, that, setting before ourselves the one hopeof our salvation, we may at length, through many toils and anxieties (the clemency and mercy of God always taking precedence of our doings), attain to that stable and ever-during salvation.

You will surely grant and concede to me, that nothing more pernicious and fearful can happen to anyone than the loss of his soul. I presume you will therefore grant also that there is no event against the occurrence of which we ought to guard with greater zeal and diligence. For when an evil, if it befalls us, is the worst of all eviIs, the danger of that evil ought to be dreaded by us as the most fearful of all dangers. T h e greater the extent of the evil, the greater must be our fear when exposed to it.

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